Loveland Water and Power Budget Breakdown

Reading and understanding a local municipal utility budget is not an easy task. It's also not a task that is at the top of your to-do list.

But, we realize that your money is the only reason we are able to provide electric, water, wastewater and now broadband services. We have a responsibility to help you understand the 'why' - Why do you fund a certain project? Why don't you spend money on another program? Why are our rates increasing?

Here’s what you can expect:

  • Easy access to 2020 budget documents.
  • Easy access to upcoming public meetings and meeting documents.
  • Budget Trivia questions posted bi-weekly.
  • Budget Trivia responses with the current Answers and Explanations.
  • We’ll pick the Budget Trivia questions and Answers and Explanations topics based on your suggestions submitted through Ask us.


Reading and understanding a local municipal utility budget is not an easy task. It's also not a task that is at the top of your to-do list.

But, we realize that your money is the only reason we are able to provide electric, water, wastewater and now broadband services. We have a responsibility to help you understand the 'why' - Why do you fund a certain project? Why don't you spend money on another program? Why are our rates increasing?

Here’s what you can expect:

  • Easy access to 2020 budget documents.
  • Easy access to upcoming public meetings and meeting documents.
  • Budget Trivia questions posted bi-weekly.
  • Budget Trivia responses with the current Answers and Explanations.
  • We’ll pick the Budget Trivia questions and Answers and Explanations topics based on your suggestions submitted through Ask us.


  • 2020 Rate Changes - What to Expect

    about 1 month ago

    Loveland Water and Power (LWP) is one of the lowest-cost municipal utility providers in Colorado. LWP remains committed to keeping costs low and reliability high for all customers.

    Like all utility providers, LWP must periodically evaluate the costs of providing reliable infrastructure to support water, power and wastewater services. Different types of customers—like residents and businesses— receive different rates based on the cost of providing the service. LWP works with expert rate consultants to review these different rates every three years, analyzing the general use of service for each group and comparing it with their unique costs.

    Before rates are...

    Loveland Water and Power (LWP) is one of the lowest-cost municipal utility providers in Colorado. LWP remains committed to keeping costs low and reliability high for all customers.

    Like all utility providers, LWP must periodically evaluate the costs of providing reliable infrastructure to support water, power and wastewater services. Different types of customers—like residents and businesses— receive different rates based on the cost of providing the service. LWP works with expert rate consultants to review these different rates every three years, analyzing the general use of service for each group and comparing it with their unique costs.

    Before rates are adjusted, LWP must present its findings to the Loveland Utilities Commission (LUC) and Loveland City Council for final approval. These organizations perform an in-depth review of each rate study so customers are charged a fair price.

    Expected 2020 Rate Increases*

    • Residential and commercial power rates to increase between 3% - 7% on average.
    • Residential and commercial water rates to increase by 7% on average.
    • Residential and commercial wastewater rates to increase by 7% on average.

    Did you know?

    • LWP is a non-profit utility committed to providing you fair rates.
    • Rate dollars are directly reinvested to maintain high-quality utility services
    • LWP cares about the future of Loveland and the growth of our community. Rate increases are an integral part of ensuring reliable utilities for the future.

    * The 2020 budget process is currently underway. These rate increases are based on preliminary forecasts. 2020 rate increases have not been finalized.


  • What is the budget process?

    about 1 month ago
    Budget process timeline

    The City's budget process begins in January with the annual City Council Goal Setting Retreat. At the Retreat, City Council establishes goals and objectives for the coming year and direction for future budgets.

    In March, the capital planning process begins. Departments develop 10‐year capital project lists. From these, the City Manager develops a draft Capital Program to present to Council in June for review. The first year of the capital program is adopted as part of the annual budget. The out‐years are approved in concept only. The Capital Program is updated annually and provides the basis for developing the budget...

    The City's budget process begins in January with the annual City Council Goal Setting Retreat. At the Retreat, City Council establishes goals and objectives for the coming year and direction for future budgets.

    In March, the capital planning process begins. Departments develop 10‐year capital project lists. From these, the City Manager develops a draft Capital Program to present to Council in June for review. The first year of the capital program is adopted as part of the annual budget. The out‐years are approved in concept only. The Capital Program is updated annually and provides the basis for developing the budget for the next year.

    In April, the base budget process begins. Departments review and revise their base budgets, which is the prior year’s adopted budget with one‐time items removed, for status quo service delivery in the budget year. Departments submit decision package requests for funding consideration of items outside of the base budget.

    Departments meet internally and with their respective boards and commissions to develop budget requests. Departmental budget conferences are held in June, with final funding decisions made in July. The draft budget is presented to CFAC in August and then to City Council in September. The budget is submitted for approval on First Reading, after a public hearing, in early October, with a Second Reading and final approval occurring in late October or early November.